--noun (singular: story; plural: stories)

1. narration: a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program.
  • "Disney's stories entertain adults as well as children."
2. a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events.
  • "He writes stories for the magazines."
3. account: a record or narrative description of past events.
  • "A history of France."
4. account: a short account of the news.
  • "The story was on the 11 o'clock news."
5. fib: a trivial lie.
  • "How can I stop my child from telling stories?."
6. floor: a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale.
"account of some happening", 12c., from Old French estorie, from Late Latin storia and Latin historia "history, account, tale, story", from Greek historia "history, record, inquiry", from historein "inquire", from histor "wise man, judge." Not differentiated from history till 1500s. As a euphemism for "lie" it dates from 1697. Story-teller is from 1709. Story of my life "sad truth" first recorded 1938.
"floor of a building", 14c., from Anglo-L. historia "floor of a building", also "picture", from Latin historia (see history). Perhaps so called because the fronts of buildings in the Middle Ages often were decorated with rows of painted windows.
How to use "Sto·ry"?
A story is the telling of some series of connected incidents or events, whether real or fictitious, in prose or verse, orally or in writing; or the series of incidents or events thus related may be termed a story. In children's talk, a story is a common euphemism for a falsehood. Tale is nearly synonymous with story, but is somewhat archaic; it is used for an imaginative, legendary, or fictitious recital, especially if of ancient date: a fairy tale; also, for an idle or malicious report: do not tell tales; "where there is no talebearer, the strife ceaseth." Prov. xxvi, 20. An anecdote tells briefly some incident, assumed to be fact. If it passes close limits of brevity, it ceases to be an anecdote, and becomes a narrative or narration. A traditional or mythical story of ancient times is a legend. A history is often somewhat poetically called a story: the story of the American civil war. Compare ALLEGORY; FICTION; HISTORY.
Synonyms
  • account - a record or narrative description of past events. "He gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president."
  • legend - a story about mythical or supernatural beings or events.
  • narrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program. "His narrative was interesting."
  • recital - a detailed statement giving facts and figures. "His wife gave a recital of his infidelities."
  • relation - a person related by blood or marriage. "He has distant relations back in New Jersey."
  • anecdote - short account of an incident (especially a biographical one).
  • myth - a traditional story accepted as history; serves to explain the world view of a people.
  • novel - a printed and bound book that is an extended work of fiction. "His bookcases were filled with nothing but novels."
  • record - to register electronically. "They recorded her singing."
  • tale - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program.
  • incident - a public disturbance. "The police investigated an incident at the bus station."
  • narration - the act of giving an account describing incidents or a course of events. "His narration was hesitant."
Antonyms
  • annals - a chronological account of events in successive years.
  • biography - an account of the series of events making up a person's life.
  • chronicle - to record in chronological order; to make a historical record.
  • history - the aggregate of past events. "A critical time in the school's history."